Cult of Personality?

We have introduced a contextual leadership focus to examine how leadership success is defined and articulated in your organization.  Povah and Sobczak have researched how to identify leaders that perform successfully within shifting priorities and cultural changes.  This contextual approach focuses on both internal affairs such as organizational culture and economics, and external factors to include the shifting economy and product/service innovations.

We know that individual organizations require their own unique skills and character traits to be successful.  It is imperative that we examine, define, and articulate those attributes in order to assess our leadership requirements and determine those we lack.

But it is the combination of this internal culture along with external conditions, business strategy, and competencies that allow us to define, cultivate, and hire the right leader for the job.  This moves us beyond a leader’s past success and winning personality.

Povah and Sobczak start with the five core elements of leadership they found through surveying numerous leadership theories.  The first of these is intelligence.

Cognitive ability is the single best predictor of job performance and IQ accounts for nearly 24% of successful leadership.  Also of great importance are the analytical, practical, and creative pieces of intellect.  However, there is strong evidence that suggests that high IQ leaders often fail to understand and motivate employees while struggling to work with those less intelligent.  This requires a very different type of intelligence which we will examine in our next blog.

What are the unique cultural traits required within your workplace for leadership success?  Have you considered mapping them out, evaluating the missing pieces, and assessed your current leaders and development programs for these traits?

 

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